Last Day to get Managing Cash When You Haven’t Got Any: Volume 3 FREE for Kindle!

Today is the last day to get Volume 3 of my eBook series Managing Cash When You Haven’t Got Any: Practical Cash Flow Strategies for Small Business, Managing Accounts Receivable and Payroll FREE for Kindle on Amazon. Download your copy today!

Prefer a hard copy? A consolidated paperback version of Volumes 1 through 3 is now also available:

Amazon

Barnes and Noble

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Is your business profitable – yet still you never seem to have enough cash?
Do you find yourself not knowing what to do with the cash you do have?
Are you constantly wondering whether you’re going to make payroll?
Are your vendors going unpaid and threatening to cut off your supplies?
Are your subcontractors refusing to work unless you pay them up front, worsening your already precarious cash situation?
Are your company credit cards and lines of credit maxed out, with no hope of borrowing more?
Are your employees irritable because you’ve reduced their benefits, and it’s been years since they’ve had a raise?
Are you irritable because you can’t stop worrying about money?
Are you wasting your precious dollars on interest and late fees, making it impossible for you to ever catch up?
Have you just started your business and find yourself running out of capital already?
Do you find yourself thinking, “I know we could succeed if only we could only pull ourselves out of this hole!”

If so, the Managing Cash When You Haven’t Got Any series is for you!

In Volume 3 of the series, I discuss how best to manage your Accounts Receivable and Payroll with the aim of maintaining good cash flow. I will tell you:

The importance of accurately predicting your inflows in creating a manageable cash flow plan.

How to use calculate how much money you’ll have coming in and when you can reasonably expect it.

Setting monthly Accounts Receivable and cash projections and goals and how doing so can both create incentives for your employees and help you to predict how your month is going to go.

Suggestions for tweaking an Accounts Receivable schedule that always leaves you cash-poor.

The pros and cons of various methods for encouraging your customers to pay you early or on time – accepting credit card payments, offering cash discounts, etc.

How and why you should turn maintaining cash inflows into a cooperative company-wide endeavor.

Why you should empower as many people in your firm to collect payments as you safely can and how to do so without sacrificing security.

The “No, we’re not desperate” plea for money and why you need to master it.

How properly setting payment expectations with your customers from the start will help to ensure that you get paid in full and on time.

How to approach collecting from private individuals versus collecting from businesses.

When to bring in the “big guns” in collections – and how using their ammunition sparingly can make it more effective.

How to make employees who are uncomfortable with the collections process more at ease when it comes to asking for money.

Lies I’ve heard collection people tell – which ones worked and which ones didn’t.

How to select a payroll schedule that works best for your firm.

How changing your current payroll schedule may solve some of your company’s cash flow problems – and possibly create others.

The differential cost of having more frequent or less frequent payrolls.

How payroll services are robbing you of control over your cash flow, and when it’s time to take it back.

Tips for minimizing your worker’s compensation expense and making sure you don’t get hit with a giant bill when your policy ends.

Understanding payroll taxes – the comparatively small expense that can have a disproportionately large impact on your cash flow.

Why not paying your payroll taxes is a really bad idea – and what to do if you haven’t.

How to deal with the IRS and other government agencies if you haven’t fulfilled your payroll or other tax obligations.

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