Buffalo Jump!

Many of us are familiar with the concept of the “Buffalo Jump,” of course, but in all my travels, I had never actually seen the site of one before. After spending a dark and stormy night outside of Rapid City, I decided to duck over to Wyoming to visit Devil’s Tower. It wasn’t long after dawn when I spotted signs on the highway directing me to this noteworthy landmark:

Buffalo Jump

Very thorough explanation, isn’t it? But what, you may be wondering, as I was, does the buffalo jump actually look like? After considerable searching in the early morning light, I finally realized that it lay in an unmarked field just across the road:

Buffalo Jump 2

That’s one heck of a sinkhole, but it doesn’t seem as though buffalo could become effectively trapped in it, does it? Perhaps not – but it was a sinkhole, after all, that was responsible for creating one of the most spectacular archaeological sites in the world today – Mammoth!

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7 thoughts on “Buffalo Jump!

  1. Pingback: Nightmare in Hot Springs: A Serial Killer Strikes Again | Lori Schafer's Short Subjects I Feel Like Writing About

  2. TanGental

    Now I had heard of this (from the fount of wisdom in our family, the Archaeologist) but to see one in practice is so cool. I need a copy of your itinerary when you’re done (maybe you’ll tell me, with good reason ‘buy the book buster’!!) so I can hunt out these gem sometime. The bucket list grows….

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  3. Charli Mills

    There’s a similar sinkhole south of Lewiston, ID that folks though was just a small spring-fed lake. Fisherman complained of snags and sometime in the 90s the lake was drained to “clean up” the bottom. Turns out all those snags were a jumble of mammoth bones! Fun to be swapping histories with you as you travel.

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